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The New Fire's 100+ year gestation

Geschrieben von Robert Greenyer am .

Part 1

In part 1 of this reveal video, MFMP volunteer Bob Greenyer talks through how he personally discovered that the roots to LENR research are founded a long time ago and that there is a wealth of open source material for researchers to explore.

You can download the presentation here


Comments   

 
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0 #9 Stephen Cooke 2016-09-09 18:42
Hello Bob,

I don't want to wonder too far of topic but I thought the following linked presentation about Magnetars might possibly be of interest to you and may be some of the data and physics is relevant to LENR even though it is obviously a very extreem environment with very high magnetic fields perhaps they still highlight underlying processes that are still relevant.

The first one on soft Gamma Repeaters is interesting I think as it shows a broad spectrum gamma nature very similar to that seen in "signal 7" from GS 5.2.

Can this be a coincidence or could it be a similar process generating this signal in this much more extreme environment?

I'm not sure if its broad spectrum nature is generated from Bremsstrahlung, some relativistic effects or some other cause.

http://www2011.mpe.mpg.de/363-heraeus-seminar/Contributions/3Wednesday/morning/KHurley.pdf

here is another interesting link giving a good background:

http://solomon.as.utexas.edu/magnetar.html

And here is another very recent but possibly related article very bright X-ray sources that might or might not actually be related somehow.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Avoiding_traffic_jam_creates_impossibly_bright_lighthouse_999.html

The following links about accelerated decays in strong Magnetic fields on the surface of magnetars may also give some insights in to what happens at nucleon level.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10509-016-2830-0

It's concerning changes in beta decay rates in the presence of magnetic fields on magnetars.

I have so far only read the abstract but I think it could be interesting.

Bob cook on vortex pointed me to the following one as well:

http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1603.01898

And I also found this one which I think resonates a lot with Axil's ideas.

http://cds.cern.ch/record/428499/files/9912301.pdf

But it's really the spectrum of the soft gamma ray repeater that grabbed my attention and made me think to raise it here.
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0 #8 Stephen Cooke 2016-09-01 13:19
Magic or Magnetic

@Bob, yup you are probably right about the Alkaline nature being important but it's curious it didn't work with MgO.

Thanks for the very interesting pointers towards Celani and Vladimir I need to dig into those a bit if I can.

If neutron capture and scattering cross sections are important though:

Interstingly it does seem that neutron cross sections are not really dependent on the charge radius and strong force but more on the spin state of the nucleus, in fact we get intersting cross section peaks at particular energies corresponding to a resononance with steps in spin state for different energy states and configurations of the nucleus.

Also the range of the effect is much larger than the strong force (a few fm) and larger than the neutron wave function.

It seems to me this effect is predominantly magnetic in nature and would be higher for nuclei with significant spin or resonant spin states. And low for symmetric nuclei such as magic nuclei in ground state.

There is a small dipole and quadrupole effect on the electric field but presumably there is also a longer range magnetic effect?

If so and there is a similar proton spin/magnetic moment effect perhaps it is not necessary for the proton shielding to keep it within a few fm but rather just with in the effect of the magnetic field similar to the neutron capture cross section.

Perhaps nucleon binding is strong force at close range but coupled magnetically at larger distances > a few fm.

I think the magnetic field drops with 1/r3 so could be quite strong close to the nucleus.

I'm not sure if that makes sense or not oh well.
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+1 #7 Robert Greenyer 2016-09-01 12:31
@Stephen

As a case in point, look at Vladimir Vysotski's 3rd paper from last years ICCF... He found that the adding Ca ions to his biological transmutation experiments was by far the most effective - speeding up the decay time of Cs137 by a factor of 35!

http://goo.gl/n9fQSM
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+1 #6 Robert Greenyer 2016-09-01 09:21
@Stephen Cooke

As I said in my recent less than perfect video, Celani's team identified the importance of Calcium ions in in 1994/5 long before Iwamura, CaO according to Iwamura is critical to enable the transmutation process. I think that it is the Alkaline metals that are the most important think - but the 'magic' nature of CaO may play a role.
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0 #5 Stephen Cooke 2016-08-26 17:54
Is a little layer of pure magic useful in LENR?

Quick lime is pure pixie dust!

I was recently looking and discussing on the LENR Forum some aspects about Iwamura's experiments with deuteron gas and palladium showing transmutation of some elements isotopes such Ba137 to Sm149 and Ba138 to Sm150.

I was originally looking at the experiments in view of the Neutron, proton and Deutron capture cross-sections. In this particular case since Ba138 is neutron magic with 82 neutrons and the final Sm isotopes have quite large neutron capture cross sections especially Sm149 with one of the highest neutron cross sections of all elements an order of magnitude higher than Boron! it's clear to me that neutrons were not involved in this particular process. But deuterons were likely absorbed despite the difficulties involved with this.

Strangely Ni which seems to be associated with neutron production and evolves to more stable isotopes is proton magic with 28 protons.

In these experiments using a thin layer of CaO on the Pd surface enhanced somehow the production of atomic deuterium on the surface of the palladium. MgO on the other hand had no effect.

It's speculated that it might be some kind of chemical effect on the palladium surface that enhances this process somehow. But the exact process is not understood.

I wonder if there is another aspect that is important. Strangely the most common isotopes of both Oxygen O16 and Calcium Ca40 are doubly magic and each also have identical numbers of protons and neutrons 8 each for Oxygen and 20 each for Ca. In effect the layer of CaO is almost fully magic nuclei except for a very few heavier isotopes.

I suppose this particular nuclei do not want to absorb deuterons, protons or Neutrons since they already strongly bound.

Can this be a coincidence I wonder or does the doubly magic nature of this layer somehow enhance the atomic deuterium production?

Perhaps this layer prevents other materials or processes interfering with the deuterium production by allowing it to quickly transfer to the surface with out further interaction or shielding it from more active nuclei before it disperses or something.

Anyway the coincident association of the elements used in some of these experiments with magic nuclei are curious I think.

CaO quick lime is has a very high melting point about 2600 deg C but is reactive with water and CO so maybe has some chemical and electric disadvantages but I wonder if it has been associated with LENR experiments elsewhere.

Incidenty CaO reaction with water of CO is quite exothermic. Producing Calcium Hydroxide or Calcium Carbonate. CaO can also be produced from these materials in an exothermic process by applying heat. It is used in cement and glass production for example. It can also be a useful way to chemically store heat.
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+1 #4 charlie tapp 2016-08-19 15:22
@robert Greenyer why you gotta say big group development now it seems you got something good comeing. I am already stir crazy because none of you guys are talking must be through email you are communicating. I can understand patience right.
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0 #3 Robert Greenyer 2016-08-19 09:49
Hi Charlie,

Everyone was on their summer break, outside the project people are focussed on speculation!

I will be putting out more videos over the coming weeks and we have a big group development.
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+1 #2 charlie tapp 2016-08-15 14:41
@robert Greenyer any word on anything going crazy here? Any word from me356 at all ? Is he giving you guys any pointers or are you in the dark also. Just thought I would ask no one seems to post here anymore. (Crickets)
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